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FEATURES

  • Missing the hits
    Drama was king this week in Cannes as factual players look for ways to grow that don’t include innovative break-out hits. Clive Whittingham reports.
  • Spoilt for choice
    This week in Cannes was dominated by talk about subscription VoD and online strategies as new and old media continued their dance along the Croisette, writes Andrew Dickens.
  • Sizing up scripted
    Drama has been hot for the past few years but at this week's Mipcom it was positively scorching, despite the torrential downpours that drenched some delegates.
  • In short order
    The popularity of shortform content on mobile and the web wasn't lost on industry executives at MipJunior and Mipcom this week. But what are channels and producers doing to capitalise on the trend? Nico Franks reports.
  • Mipcom: Stay healthy
    Kristi Sanders, CEO and founder of holistic health blog The Glow Life, tells Mipcom delegates what they need to know to stay healthy this week.
  • Ahead of the game
    Gameshows have undergone a resurgence in France recently, with DTT channels entering the genre and France 2 developing new programming. Marie-Agnés Bruneau reports.
  • A crafty purchase
    Minecraft, one of the most popular kids' properties around, won't be on TV anytime soon, despite video being an integral part of its success. Nico Franks reports from BLE in London.
  • Keeping the wolf from the door
    Todd Lituchy, CEO of London indie New Media Vision, tells Clive Whittingham about the distributor's move into production and its first factual project.
  • Future hits and myths
    Ancient mythology, murder mystery, black humour, political suspense and period spectacle all get a look-in as Ed Waller picks out the new shows most likely to cause a stir at Mipcom – and finds drama is by far the dominant genre.
  • Scare tactics
    International buyers could be in for a shock at Mipcom next week if the producers of a new BBC drama have their way. Nico Franks reports.
  • Social gathering
    Telemundo Media's singing format Yo Soy El Artista is changing the way TV shows integrate social media, claims the firm's digital supremo Peter Blacker. Andrew Dickens reports.
  • Talent for television
    Harry Bell, creative director at Scottish indie Tern TV, considers how to find fresh, unusual talent to make your factual shows stand out for commissioners, and how to keep them onboard if the show succeeds.
  • Korea prospects
    South Korea has begun its first push to forge scripted coproduction partnerships with the UK, with the development of the country's storytelling high on the agenda. Gün Akyuz reports.
  • Pick of the litter
    Ed Waller suggests the 21 shows not to be missed at Mip Junior, from Stone Age rockstars, book adaptations and live-action to toon revivals and alien invasions.
  • Diversity centre
    It's not just US viewers who are getting used to the changing complexion and tone of the country's programming – international buyers are too. Kevin Downey reports.
  • Testing toons
    Cartoon Forum's relaxed atmosphere and creative energy means it will always be a favourite for global buyers, but is it in danger of giving all the limelight to France? Nico Franks reports.
  • War of independents
    Clive Whittingham looks at how independent distribution companies fit into a rapidly consolidating UK television industry.
  • Independent thought
    Avi Armoza, founder and CEO of Israel's Armoza Formats, tells C21 about trends in the industry, his strategic thinking and the fruits of his recent development alliances around the globe.
  • Catering for big appetites
    Children's media producer Don Moody, CEO at New York-based Moody Studios, considers the effects of binge viewing on kids' content and how producers can adapt to it.
  • Reaching across the pond
    Ailsa Orr, creative director at Pioneer Productions, discusses challenges facing UK indies as they attempt to crack the US, the differences between the markets and the do’s and don’ts for producers thinking of making the move.
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EDITOR'S CHOICE

  • Social gathering Telemundo Media's singing format Yo Soy El Artista is changing the way TV shows integrate social media, claims the firm's digital supremo Peter Blacker. Andrew Dickens reports.
  • Korea prospects South Korea has begun its first push to forge scripted coproduction partnerships with the UK, with the development of the country's storytelling high on the agenda. Gün Akyuz reports.
  • Pick of the litter Ed Waller suggests the 21 shows not to be missed at Mip Junior, from Stone Age rockstars, book adaptations and live-action to toon revivals and alien invasions.
  • Diversity centre It's not just US viewers who are getting used to the changing complexion and tone of the country's programming – international buyers are too. Kevin Downey reports.
  • Testing toons Cartoon Forum's relaxed atmosphere and creative energy means it will always be a favourite for global buyers, but is it in danger of giving all the limelight to France? Nico Franks reports.
  • War of independents Clive Whittingham looks at how independent distribution companies fit into a rapidly consolidating UK television industry.
  • Independent thought Avi Armoza, founder and CEO of Israel's Armoza Formats, tells C21 about trends in the industry, his strategic thinking and the fruits of his recent development alliances around the globe.
  • Catering for big appetites Children's media producer Don Moody, CEO at New York-based Moody Studios, considers the effects of binge viewing on kids' content and how producers can adapt to it.
  • Reaching across the pond Ailsa Orr, creative director at Pioneer Productions, discusses challenges facing UK indies as they attempt to crack the US, the differences between the markets and the do’s and don’ts for producers thinking of making the move.
  • Digital power play Beth Stevenson, founder and president at Canada's Brain Power Studio, discusses the best ways children’s producers can appeal to their digital-savvy audience.